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CSPAN
Aug 5, 2013 9:00pm EDT
>> tonight we start at the beginning, exploring the life and times of martha washington. >> martha washington was george washington's confidant. >> she was a person very absorbed in duty and very capable. but she didn't like that. she called herself a prisoner of state. >> by the same token that every step washington took to find the office, so in a very real sense kit be said everything martha washington did like wise. >> it was a business-like relationship, but not i think without affection. i think they had deep respect and affection for each other. >> it was as close to her how many town. she would own most of this block going back a couple acres, which mean she owned a huge chunk of what williamsburg was. there was a lot of tragedy in martha washington's life, she lost her first husband. she was raised a rich woman. now, what that means in 18th century is not familiesly what it means today. >> when she marries george washington she brings with her to mount vernon 12 house slaves, and that is really almost an unimaginable luxury. >> it takes her 10 days to travel here to valley
CSPAN
Aug 5, 2013 10:30pm EDT
quick final question from julie the road from mt. verse non and washington's port city. hello. >> george washington and george may sorry were very good friends. two wives, had anne, and she passed away. and then sara. wondering what the relationship was between martha and either of george mason's wives? >> they were friendly neighbors know, they never became intimate friends. friendship was a political casualty. but after the constitutional onvention, which, of course, washington sanctioned and mason it spelled in , many ways an end to their friendship. twitter, george and martha washington, quite the power couple. we close out bringing us full circle, what are the important things for people to the influence of martha washington. >> i think it's important to powerful she and on and how dependent he was her. his achievements were his achievements. him aving her there with made them much more possible. >> i think that's true. defined influence in a way that perhaps contemporary have difficulty understanding. but the fact of the matter is, she was the most influential of the earth face w
CSPAN
Aug 6, 2013 1:00am EDT
washington martha. she was always called patsy as lady bird johnson was never called claudia. so i was just wondering, you mentioned in his letters when he referred to her in his letter that it was just mentioned on the telephone that he did call her patsy. and i also wanted to mention that in the story that i'm reading about martha and george washington that the house, mt. vernon, was originally the home of his half brother, george washington's half brother. that he lived in a smaller farm. and i wondered if you are going to talk anything about his years as a surveyor or is this really about the years with martha as an adult? >> thank versus much. this is actually martha washington's time in the sun. so we won't talk about george's early career. what about the nickname patsy? >> patsy, pat, patty were the nicknames for martha in those days just as peg or peggy is a nickname for margaret. the martha nickname has fallen out of favor. nobody was named patricia back then. the only patsies were martha's. that was simply the common name. >> the smaller farm she's reference ing? >> smaller, it wa
CSPAN
Aug 11, 2013 11:00am EDT
, if we go out there to wilkes barre now, do you think we could find george washington, thomas jefferson, james madison, george mason, john marshall and patrick henry? we ain't going to find them. now, at some theoretical level they are there. that is, human beings with the capacity for leadership are there, but the situation doesn't permit that group to rise to the surface. and so the question is, why did that situation exist in 1776? now, there is another answer to this, which is that great leadership only emerges during times of great crisis. and this makes eminent sense, the pressure that the crisis creates. and yet we can all think of examples where there's a great crisis and there's no leadership. like now. [laughter] [applause] >> or the coming of your -- world war i in europe. so what was special, you can't say there was something special in the water back there then. you can't say god looked down upon the american college and bless them. supernatural explanations are not admitted. even if you're an evangelical you're not allowed to use those in a historical conversation. i don't
PBS
Aug 2, 2013 11:00pm PDT
company" -- 50 years after the historic march on washington, we go back to the scene with john lewis, who spoke that day half a century ago. where you're standing now, looking out there. that's all the crowd. >> it was good to be in the presence of lincoln. and i feel honored to have an opportunity to come here almost 50 years later. >> announcer: funding is provided by -- carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org. anne gumowitz. the betsy and
PBS
Aug 27, 2013 6:00pm PDT
warner has the latest on options for action in syria. then we return to the march on washington 50 years on. tonight reflections from the last living speaker, georgia congressman john liu business. >> it was all inclusive it was black and white, latino, asia asian-american and native american. >> they came from idaho, wyoming, and they were there. carrying their signs. >> and we conclude our series on governing in a time of gridlock with a look at how the entertainment world sees the nation's capital. >> the question we ask is if someone is actually getting something done, do the ends justify the means? it is an interesting question to ask when washington is paralyzed by gridlock. >> that is all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by... moving our economy for 160 years, bnsf the engine that connects us. >> and the hewlett foundation working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and this program was made possible by the corporation for pub
Univision
Aug 24, 2013 6:30pm EDT
the point i was trying to make before the washington redskins have the ball, 10 1/2 minutes, the buffalo bills, 4 1/2 minutes. and there is the pop. >> chick: min griltd with the big hit. >> joe: that's the point now. if you run this up tempo offense, you know, you better stay on. these guys are gassed. you get into the third quarter, get into the fourth quarter, and it's a 10-5 ratio, that's a lot of football being played by the defense. buffalo has 8 first downs. it is a great theory if you can adhere to it but you have to get first downs. >> chick: choice with the carry herewashington redskins may remember him. had he a cuff of coffee here. and three in and three out. with that series, nothing over five yards. they have not tried to go over the field. they have run by david emerson a couple of times. one of the guys is marcus easley, number 81, he has not played a lot. he will probably get some more. >> chick: and the sean powell. powell with the punt of 48 yards. we'll take a timeout here and pat white now back here ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] introducing live tv from southwest. n
CSPAN
Aug 10, 2013 7:00pm EDT
by side with james compilingelping him. and arranging his papers. >> she moved back to washington d.c. in her elder years and became very much behind the scenes in a political field again. >> as henry clay famously said, everybody loves mrs. madison. her equally famous response "that's because mrs. madison loves everybody." >> dolley madison came to her service as first lady with experience during thomas jefferson's two terms. the president often called on her to assist him. this sense of the usefulness of diplomacy allowed dolley to hit the ground wanting when she assumed the role in 1809 as her husband james madison became andpresident.good evening welcome. tonight we will learn about the intriguing dolley madison. we have two guests at our table. let me introduce you to them. catherine allgor, an author and biographer of dolley madison. and a historian. one of her books is called "a perfect union." thank you for being here. edith mayo was the creator of the first lady's exhibit at the smithsonian. so many smithsonian visitors have seen this throughout the years. thank you for bei
PBS
Aug 30, 2013 11:05pm PDT
georgia. recently, he and i returned to the national mall in washington to remember that day in 1963 and the march that changed america. >> people were all the way down. and you just saw hundreds and thousands of individuals. i'm john lewis, and i was the youngest speaker. ten of us spoke. i spoke number six. dr. king spoke number ten. and out of the ten people that spoke that day, i'm the only one still around. >> congratulations. >> what's that? >> congratulations. >> thank you very much. >> it was a great moment in american life. >> you were his friend? >> yeah. i got to know dr. king. i met him in 1958 when i was 18. but i first heard of him when i was 15 years old in the 10th grade. we worked together. we marched together. we got arrested together in selma, alabama. >> have you ever heard this story before? >> yes, i have. >> you have? >> i watched it on tv. >> you did? >> so you know about the sit-ins? the freedom ride? >> yeah. >> people marching for the right to vote? you know, i was on the march from selma to montgomery. i was beaten. on march 7th, 1965, a group of us, about
CSPAN
Aug 7, 2013 9:00pm EDT
. definitionging the of cancelable reduce unnecessary treatments. washington journal is live tomorrow. will be back here with the c- span townhall tomorrow looking at immigration and the economy live at 7:00 eastern. thank you for joining us this evening. session two of first ladies and ladies, influence image begins. all this month we are showing encore presentations of season one. programs on every first lady from martha washington to ida mckinley. tonight, it is doubly medicine. -- dolly madison. >> dolley was socially adept and politically savvy. >> she was his best friend. she compensated. >> james madison wishes to meet her. >> she carved out a space for women where they can wield a great deal of political power. >> dolley madison would sit at the head of the table and erect the conversation. >> she got these people to the white house and entertained them. got them together and got them talking. >> this was important to her to make everyone feel welcome. >> it was considered her classic look. people noticed it. >> it was a perfect setting for james and dolley madison >> she sat side by side w
CBS
Aug 20, 2013 7:00am EDT
on washington. we are sharing them. it is 7:11.  junk keys junkies junki rise and shine for school, kids. this is a picture of amber makel who is a junior in high school. this is her. it is not a selfie, she looks great. thank you for tweeting this, amber. what about this? this sharp young man, this is dominic jones, ready for kindergarten at imagine foundation. that is so cute. have a great day and great year, dominic. thanks for sending a picture. i love the students in their uniform. they are the cutest thing in their ties. they look so professional. first day of school in calvert, maryland. more pictures should be coming in. you high schoolers tweet us@myfoxdc. we have seen some cute ones. the little uniform. looking like a businessman ready to go to school. love it. >> i know. i asked the kids, what is your job? >> we are students. >> it is. you have to take it seriously. >> did you take it seriously? >> we are a close group of co-workers. what is going on out there? >> the fog is thick in spots. not so much in the city although we have it along the potomac. i have
CNN
Aug 25, 2013 8:00am PDT
it in 50 years. the 1963 march on washington. >> now back to roger mudd. >> here at the lincoln memorial, the sight that is almost something no washingtonian has beheld. >> news reports from the march along with coverage of the civil rights movement helped change minds about the protesters and the fight to end segregation. we'll talk with the reporters who were there, including dan rather, who reported for cbs news and paul delaney, a founding member of the national association of black journalists. >>> plus "the new york times" says espn dropped its partnership with public tv's "front line" when the nfl objected to a documentary about head injuries. does this show the influence sports leagues have over sports journali journalism's biggest player? >>> and are you one of the movie goers that made this the top-grossing film last weekend? >> there he is. what's your name sdm. >> cecil gaines. >> i'm carter wilson, head butler. >> did you know the story of "the butler" began with one reporter's quest for the ultimate white house insider? we'll talk with the "washington post"'s wil haygood ab
CSPAN
Aug 29, 2013 5:00pm EDT
approaches this situation is a top priority. "the washington post" published something online that u.s.,s details about the that the budget has grown enormously since 9/11, that the cia is far bigger than outside experts had estimated, that the u.s. is involved in new cyber programs to attack other programs in countries. this information has never been released despite efforts from outside folks. does the president believe this is helpful now and the current climate to have discussion about the details about how the u.s. is spending its money in these departments to get a better understanding, as he said, make the public comfortable with how this money is being spayed and what type of programs are being used? -- that storyhed was published since i walked out here. i'm not in a position to comment on a specific story. the president believes that strengthening public confidence in these programs is important to the success of these programs. there is little debate about the fact these programs are critical to our national security, that they have made a role in protecting the homeland
Al Jazeera America
Aug 28, 2013 10:00pm EDT
gathered in washington, d.c. again. former presidents, celebrities and every day americans were there. >> near two weeks, firefighters are till fighting that fire out in california. we'll have the latest news coming up at 11:00 here on aljazeera. ♪ theme ♪ theme >> as the u.s. may be drawing closinger to intervention in syria polls vin to show a large majority of americans oppose military action. how can the u.s. build an international coalition when its leaders can't build one here at home? also, twitter, google and "the new york times" websites suffer cyber attacks. a group connected to the syrian government is the likely culprit. how vulnerable is america's cyber infra structure to another attack. >> the women who worked side by side with the men during the civil movement the were given their proper due. >> we begin with syria, and how an attack that seemed eminent may be less so now. president obama it is he hasn't yet decided to take action. while britain, france and turkey are open to military intervention, the u.n. and arab league are far from a consensus. as we report, ave
MSNBC
Aug 24, 2013 12:00pm EDT
to make the first march on washington and i never really got over that until president obama said please lead us in the invocation, and that was in january of this year. thank you reverend sharpton and others for asking me to lend a few words to this most precious gatheri gathering as i look out at the crowd, i find myself saying, what are we doing today? where have we come from? what has been accomplished and where do we go from this point forwa forward? i think of one theme that has been played over and over in the past few months and it's one that bring great controversy. stand your ground. and we can think of standing your ground in the negative, but i ask you today to flip that coin and make stand your ground a positive ring for all of us who believe in freedom and justice and equality, that we stand firm on the ground that we have already made and be sure that nothing is taken away from us because there are efforts to turn back the clock of freedom. and i ask you today will you allow that to happen? take the words "stand your ground" in a positive sense. stand your ground in terms
CBS
Aug 21, 2013 7:00am EDT
be a lie. >> got my attention. priceless memories, firsthand witnesses to march on washington gathered in d.c. for a special celebration. we are going to take you there. >> first honoring the best of the best, '72 dolphins get their white house moment. only taken 37 years. 7:09, we'll be right back. ask me what it's like to get your best night's sleep every night. [announcer] why not talk to someone who's sleeping on the most highly recommended d in america? ask me about my tempur-pedic. ask me how fast i fall asleep. ask me about staying asleep. [announcer] tempur-pedic owners are more satisfied than owners of any traditional mattress brand. tempur-pedic. the most highly recommended bed in america. buy a tempur-pedic mattress set and get a free twin tempur-simplicity mattress. find a store near you at tempurpedic.com. ♪ turn around ♪ every now and then i get a little bit hungry ♪ ♪ and there's nothing good for me around ♪ ♪ turn around ♪ every now and then i get a little bit tired ♪ ♪ of craving something that i can't have ♪ ♪ turn around barbara ♪ i finally found t
CSPAN
Aug 5, 2013 6:00am EDT
of blacks in the white house. >> yes. >> this is a q&a for a couple of years ago about the martha washington's slave -- pick it up at the end. >> she found out early 1796 that martha washington was planning to give her away as a wedding gift. during slavery, slaves were given away. this was upsetting for her. because when they died, they would free individuals who were slave to them. and she had hoped down the road she would be out of the institution. but if she's going to be given away, that meant her whole life was going to be in slavery. she's going make plans to escape. she writes, she talks about later, one evening, late spring, 1796 while the washingtons were silting at the dinner table waiting for her to serve them, she went out the back door. rather than say, you know, she escaped, we don't like it, but we'll leave it alone. george decides to kidnap her. they send a nephew back to kidnap her which was actually fairly common. >> how many stories in history like this, slaves in the white house? >> many stories. there were african-americans in the white house, except the james buchanan
CSPAN
Aug 31, 2013 7:00pm EDT
on anniversary of the march on washington, and the legacy of martin luther king jr.. series, first ladies, influence and image. over the next couple of hours, we will visit places with history curators. away fighting the revolutionary war, martha washington ran their plantation. >> it is clear that martha arrived at mount vernon in 1859 and there was a lot of management that she had to do. when she married george washington, she brings with her to mount vernon 12 housemates. that is really almost unimaginable luxury. these are slaves that are for the most part, not field labor, not producing crops, which is where your income is coming from. they are doing things like cooking, serving at table, clean the house, doing the laundry, doing selling, this is not productive labor in the sense that it is not productive income. she brings them with her and she brings financial resources to the marriage as well as her managerial skills. it makes mount vernon a successful operation and it makes it possible for washington to be away for eight years fighting a war. the fact that he has this support sys
WHUT
Aug 21, 2013 6:00am EDT
por espionaje... miles de estudiantes universitarios regresaran a clases en washington, pero recibiran un duro golpe en su economia.. y es que segun un informe, el costo para estacionarse en los planteles incrementara consideradamente... claudia uceda nos tiene los detalles.. daniel empieza su vida universitaria en la capital y aun no sabe si necesitara un auto. daniel aizenman/estudiante universitario " aun no tengo un plan, podria considerarlo." estos padres ya dejaron a su hijo en los dormitorios del campus de american university, ellos son conscientes que su hijo tendra que tomar decisiones. samuel aizenman/padre de daniel "me imagino que es el quien va a tener que lidiar con este costo. sabra si va a tener que tener carro, una bicicleta o nada ..." futuro que le puede costar muy caro a muchos estudiantes que llegan a la capital... ya que de acuerdo con la triple a los costos de los permisos para estacionar vehiculos en universidades han aumentado en algunos casos como un 80 porciento jeanette tejada/portavoz aaa "el estacionamiento es muy limitado y caro en washington dc..." el es
MSNBC
Aug 25, 2013 7:00am PDT
-perry. live this morning from washington, d.c. where thousands of people turned out to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the march on washington for jobs and freedom yesterday. only one man who spoke from the steps of the lincoln memorial five decades ago remains alive today, congressman john lewis, and he spoke forcefully. >> i got arrested 40 times during the '60s, beaten, left bloody and unconscious. but i'm not tired, i'm not weary. i'm not prepared to sit down and give up. i am ready to fight and continue the fight, and you must fight. >> although the architect of the march has passed away, many of the inequities that prompted the struggle remain firmly in place. in 1963 the march called for equal access to jobs, fair wages, unfettered voting rights and intraracial segregation, access to decent health care, schools, housing. half a century later the struggle continues. the struggle continues for decent work and humane conditions that pays a living wage of the nationwide unemployment rate is 7.4%. for african-americans it's 12.6%. for young african-american men between 20 and 24 the u
CSPAN
Aug 7, 2013 10:30pm EDT
't it be nice if we had her back in washington now. >> we only skimmed the surface in 90 minutes of 81 entering years of life. if you want to learn more. i thank the white house historical association for their ♪elp in this series. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] ♪ >> on c-span tonight, libyan activist discuss. then another chance to watch "first ladies" on the life of dolley madison. >> coming up on the next "washington journal," -- 's tomorrow night, on c-span encore presentation of "first ladies" -- is not>> campaigning allowed. you cannot do that and you cannot ask for office directly. you have used subtle back channels. women were a good conduit for that. come to spread their gossip and ask their favors. she knows she cannot trust these people. she is not naÏve. a lot of them are spreading false information, false gossip, they are misleading and have all of their own agendas. she is aware of the political gain going on and is not a fan. >> the encore presentation continues tomorrow night at 9:00 eastern o
CSPAN
Aug 27, 2013 5:00pm EDT
be the secretary of dhs is the most thankless job in washington. that is not true. no doubt, it is a very big and comics job. it is literally a 24/7 job, that as my successor will soon learn, it is also one of the most rewarding jobs there is. what you do hear matters to the lives of people all across our great nation him and your decisions affect them in direct and tangible ways. you make sure their families are safe from terrorist threats, that their local first responders have equipment and training and funding, and that when disaster strikes people who have lost everything are given food and shelter and hope. and that thanks for that is not owed any single individual or cabinet secretary, but to that 240,000 dhs employees, many of whom work in tough conditions around the clock to accomplish our shared and noble mission, and that includes some who have made the ultimate sacrifice for our country. they are the backbone of your nation's homeland security, and over the past 4 1/2 years, it has been my pleasure to serve with them and build a more agile department of homeland security. i thank
CSPAN
Aug 13, 2013 9:00pm EDT
night at 9:00 p.m. eastern on c-span programs on every first lady from martha washington to ida mckinley. tonight, sarah polk, mark rhett taylor and abigail fillmore. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] sarah polk was on diplomacy and her strong suit is intelligence and political discussion. >> she made no bones about the fact she took an interest in politics. and that she was her husband's partner. >> she grew naup political household in tennessee. her father was a local politician so she grew up loving politics. she married james after he won a seat in the legislature. because she would not have married him if he had -- >> unfortunately for james k. polk he died three months after leaving the white house. and sarah began a 42-year widowhood. polk place became a shrine to her husband and she would invite anybody who wanted to to come to visit and see the objects she had collected through her long and illustrious political career. >> to live there for many years on her own. during the civil war, generals on both
CSPAN
Aug 28, 2013 12:00am EDT
at the 1963 march on washington for jobs on freedom. "he has got the whole world in his hands. >> let us listen please to the words of this song and understand that in the heart of our creator, every soul has the same value and should be valued equally. thank you very much for the opportunity to sing for you. ♪ he's got the whole world in his hands. he's got the whole wide world in his hands. he's got the whole world in his hands. he's got the whole world in his hands. [singing "he's got the whole ♪orld in his hands"] ♪ [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, the speaker of the united states house of representatives, the honorable john boehner. >> how about a round of applause? [applause] let me thank my colleagues for their testimonials and express my gratitude to all the members of staff of the congressional black caucus in their assistance planning this ceremony. we have many guests. the mayor is here. our attorney general is here. we want to welcome all of you. right now, i have the distinct honor of introducing a great patriot, the recipient of the presidential medal of freedom, a
PBS
Aug 22, 2013 3:00pm PDT
driving the politics and gridlock in washington with two authors and veteran political journalists: robert draper and mark leibovich. >> you do wonder, when people are in office, when people are in power, who are they really working for? are they in it to serve the public good, or are they in it for self-service? >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: president obama took aim at the soaring cost of college today with an ambitious plan to rate schools and link tuition prices to federal financial aid. >> a higher education is the single best investment y
CSPAN
Aug 4, 2013 8:00pm EDT
martha washington's slave. out in 1796,ound that martha washington was planning to give her away. during the planning, slaves were away. this was upsetting, because the washington's had promised to free their slaves when they died. and she was going to be given away, that meant that she was going to be in slavery. she may plan to escape. she talks about this later, one whenng, in 1796, washington was sitting at the dinner table, literally, waiting for them to serve him, she escaped. she -- george decides that they are going to kidnap her. that was fairly common. >> how many stories are there like this? >> many. there were always african americans in the white house. james buchanan's administration. were upset.ners he dismissed the african- american staff and brought in irish and english house servants. that is the only time that happened. left the hercules, washington compound and was never found again. they think he was in new york. they do not know. not a lot of effort was made to find him. hise is trouble about slaves and hers. he freed his and he did not free hers. i do not know the
CSPAN
Aug 8, 2013 9:00pm EDT
-span. programs on every first lady, from martha washington. tonight, elizabeth munro and catherine adams. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] ♪ >> elizabeth monroe was a true partner in her husband's career. they were a love story and absolutely devoted to each other. elizabeth monroe had a well- developed sense of style and image. this is a woman who knew how to carry herself with great elegance. >> it is called the era of good feeling. >> this is a woman who spoke french. >> very great beauty. she received is seldom anything in the white house. she hated it. >> dignity, civility. those are the words that come to mind. >> elizabeth monroe served as first lady from 1817 to 1825 as a time known as the era of good feeling. coming up, we will explore her life and what were not always happy times inside the white house for this woman born into a well-to-do new york family. she married james monroe at the age of 17 and traveled new york extensively with him. she brought with her to the white house a certain french
CSPAN
Aug 15, 2013 7:00am EDT
morning, august 15. ahead on the "washington journal ," your reaction to the latest development in egypt and what the u.s. response should be. you should join the conversation at (202) 585-3880, our line for republicans. (202) 585-3881 for democrats. we also have our line for independents at (202) 585-3882. join us on facebook, send us a tweet, or e-mail address, journal@c-span.org. at somegin with a look of the headlines from outside the u.s., the "guardian" newspaper -- egypt's bloody crackdown. when the story first went to prince, the death toll was 200 78. overnight, the death toll has been updated to 421. there is this from the "miami killed asundreds egypt's forces storm the protest camps. a similar headline from "usa today," egypt the reps in chaos. -- a reps and chaos. from the "wall street journal" website -- egypt's military regime a reps setting off a day of violence that left at least 421 people dead. the government fractured and ties with its international partners in tatters. cairo streets were calm this morning following the curfew overnight with funerals for the dead. fur
Al Jazeera America
Aug 24, 2013 7:00am EDT
cord, tacoma washington. >> a short time okay t hamid karzi reacted to the bales' sentencing >> a life sentence to him or a death sentence to him will not bring back our children that he killed. if will not bring back the happiness of those families and will not replace the loss that the afghan nation suffered. >>> karzi also said he does not back capital punishment and asked that the u.s. provided compensation to the families of those killed. >>> the sentencing phase of the trial begins made for major nadal hassan. a military jury found him guilty of killing 13 fellow soldiers in 2009. hassan admitted to the murders in court and had no reaction on friday when the guilty verdict was red. the jury will now decide if he will be executed for his crimes or spend the rest of his life in prison. >>> washington state police are hunting for a teenager who is suspected of beating an 88-year-old world war ii veteran to death. another teenager is already in custody for the crime. police found the veteran in his car on wednesday with serious injuries. he died in the hospital yesterday. so far, police do no
WHUT
Aug 23, 2013 6:00am EDT
inmigracion entonces no dudaba, no tenia razon para dudar." claudia uceda/ washington, d. c. esta tecnica es muy comun entre estafadores, se llama caller id spoofing o engano de identificador de llamadas. basicamente lo que hace es registrar en su celular el numero del servicio de inmigracion y ciudadania." sin decir cifras de cuantos casos existen, uscis investiga de costa a costa...mientras, el gobierno tiene un mensaje contundente de alerta para el publico: cuelgue el telefono. joanne ferreira/portavoz del servicio de ciudadania e inmigracion (uscis) "cualquier contacto de la agencia viene directamente por escrito y viene en papel oficial. es una cosa oficial, no viene por telefono. nunca se le va a pedir a nadie un pago por telefono." y, si bien es cierto que muchos ya tienen sus respuestas en el caso que reciban estas llamadas... maria velasquez/inmigrante "le diria que me presente los papeles y que lo voy a averiguar." juana salomon/inmigrante "indagar si verdaderamente esa llamada viene de inmigracion." hay aquellos que no saben como reportarlo. eliseo garcia/inmigrante "no creo que
FOX
Aug 8, 2013 10:00pm EDT
the run. you see the corners up they want to play man to man like he did in washington and they realize they are going to play bigger receivers so more physical in the secondary. >> picks up a first down. there is a flag. >> illegal hands to the face no. 29 defense. the penalty is declined with the completed pass. first down. >> that's wilson. he just did that off head. there's the shot to the head just can't do it. >> any time you go near somebody's head, you are probably going to get a flag. >> redskins the penalty takes a result of the play and now royster tackled by eight year wimbley six and a half remaining in the third quarter. kirk causes started the game for the redskins. titans then scored two first quarter touch downs chris johnson. redskins tied the hankerson late second quarter. second down and 9. wide receivers screen nick william out of you con his first representation. city of richmond thanks the washington redskins for making richard pond virginia welcomes all fans of the burgundy and gold to visit the new facility and explore the richmond religion. >> the washington re
NBC
Aug 8, 2013 4:30am EDT
into what started ask apartment fire in southeast washington that sent six people to the hospital. no word on the extent of the injuries. that fires started in the 800 block of denver street. we will have a live report from the scene coming up at the top of our 5:00 hour. >> following another developing story, out of d.c. this morning that's where police are looking into an officer involved shooting. now the detailed are very squares, but we do know that a suspect shot a juvenile in the 3,000 block of deboyce street. at some point, a police officer also damaged his or her weapon, there's still no word on where that suspect is this morning. well, switching gears now to the story that has the whole country buzzing. >> yeah, a winning power ball numbers were drawn, and there are three winning tickets splitting that $448 million jackpot. what are holds these numbers is about to collect a serious chunk of change. there are three jackpot winning tickets and those lucky people will share roughly $448 million. >> two of the winning tickets were sold in new jersey, one at the super stop and shop in
FOX News
Aug 24, 2013 10:00am PDT
at the washington monument. marking 50 years since hundreds of thousands of americans descend order the national mall to hear the reverend dr. martin luther king deliver one of the most famous speeches in american history. some of the thousands in washington were actually there on august 28, 1963. as we take a look at the scenes from 50 years ago and many on hand today who weren't even born yet. all celebrating the great strides america has made on race since the darkest days of the civil rights era. and also acknowledging their there is much more that can and must be done. we will go live to the washington monument in just a few minutes. we begin with a fox news alert out of our nation's capital where president obama has been holding a meeting that could have phonily major implication as he and his national security team discuss reports of a chemical weapons attack in syria. and at an investigation that could soon lead to some kind of u.s. military response. hello. i'm kelly wright. welcome to a brand new hour of "america's news headquarters." >> i'm heather chillders. u.n. investigators arrive
CSPAN
Aug 23, 2013 6:00am EDT
in the 1963 march on washington remember the events of that day in a discussion hosted by the martin luther king, jr. memorial library in washington, d.c. this is an hour 30 minutes. >> when our archivist suggested that i conduct oral histories with people that attended the march, i jumped at the opportunity to hear firsthand accounts of the days that i, like many of you, had only known about in books, photos and media reflections. i was curious about literal and other journeys that people took to get to the lincoln memorial on that hot august day in 1963. we put out a call for people it into the march to be interviewed and the panelists here today were the first to answer that call. it is important to note that this is the beginning of an ongoing project and derek and our collection not only oral histories but also memorabilia and other artifacts from the march to the washingtonian the community archive. two of the panelists, peter bailey and doctor ella kelly were right under my nose as their regular attendees to the black studies lecture series that takes place in the black study center
CSPAN
Aug 5, 2013 8:30pm EDT
washington post" company agreed monday to sell its flagship newspaper to amazon.com founder and chief executive jeffrey these those. ownership of the paper after four generations. next week at back at former "washington post" owner the late katharine graham discussing her biography, personal history. c-span: author personal history did your children learn anything from this book about you? >> guest: that's a hard question. i'm sure they probably did but i couldn't tell you exact a wife. c-span: all of the stuff in here about your early life and your husband about that, did you talk that out? >> guest: yes, i think they understand that he was ill. the oldest one was 20 and the youngest one was 11 so they had to deal with it then and always. c-span: the question i had after i read the book was why do you want us to know all of this? >> guest: i really don't suppose that i meant to tell everything to everybody but once i sat down to write my story i just tend to be frank and open and i wanted to be very truthful and i wrote it the way i saw it. i told it the best i could. c-span: when di
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